Archiv der Kategorie: ernährung

Haben Nitrosamine etwas zu tun mit Alzheimer, Parkinson und Diabetes?

Die Aerztin Suzanne de la Monte postuliert einen Zusammenhang zwischen dem Einsatz von Nitrat in der Landwirtschaft und Nitrit als Konservierungsmittel für u.a. Fleischprodukte und der wachsenden Zahl von Alzheimer-, Parkinson- und Diabetesfällen:

Led by Suzanne de la Monte, MD, MPH, of Rhode Island Hospital, researchers studied the trends in mortality rates due to diseases that are associated with aging, such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, diabetes and cerebrovascular disease, as well as HIV. They found strong parallels between age adjusted increases in death rate from Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and diabetes and the progressive increases in human exposure to nitrates, nitrites and nitrosamines through processed and preserved foods as well as fertilizers. Other diseases including HIV-AIDS, cerebrovascular disease, and leukemia did not exhibit those trends. De la Monte and the authors propose that the increase in exposure plays a critical role in the cause, development and effects of the pandemic of these insulin-resistant diseases.

De la Monte, who is also a professor of pathology and lab medicine at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, says, „We have become a ’nitrosamine generation.‘ In essence, we have moved to a diet that is rich in amines and nitrates, which lead to increased nitrosamine production. We receive increased exposure through the abundant use of nitrate-containing fertilizers for agriculture.“ She continues, „Not only do we consume them in processed foods, but they get into our food supply by leeching from the soil and contaminating water supplies used for crop irrigation, food processing and drinking.“

Ihr Artikel (das ist der Medientext dazu) erschien in der Zeitschrift Journal of Alzheimer’s disease

Der neurologische Grund für die Siesta

AlphaGalileo meldet

The Spaniards may have been right all along – a siesta after a hearty lunch is natural, new research suggests. Sientists at The University of Manchester have for the first time uncovered how brain cells or ‘neurons’ that keep us alert become turned off after we eat. The findings – published in the scientific journal Neuron this week – have implications for treating obesity and eating disorders as well as understanding levels of consciousness. “It has been known for a while that people and animals can become sleepy and less active after a meal, but brain signals responsible for this were poorly understood,” said Dr Denis Burdakov, the lead researcher based in Manchester’s Faculty of Life Sciences.

Siesta für alle!

Omega-3-Fettsäuren: positive Wirkung unklar

Eine Literaturstudie, publiziert im aktuellen BMJ, kommt zum Schluss, dass die gesundheitsfördernde Wirkung von Omega-3-Fettsäuren sich nicht hart belegen lässt. Das dazugehörende Communiqué meint:

A study published online by the BMJ today doesn't find evidence of a clear benefit of omega 3 fats on health. These findings do not rule out an important effect of omega 3 fats, but suggest that the evidence should be reviewed regularly, say the researchers. Consumption of long chain omega 3 fatty acids, found in oily fish and fish oils, and a shorter chain omega 3, found in some plant oils, is thought to protect against heart disease. UK guidelines encourage the general public to eat more oily fish, and higher amounts are advised after a heart attack. Researchers analysed 89 studies (48 randomised controlled trials and 41 cohort studies) to assess the health effects of long and short chain omega 3 fats on total mortality, cardiovascular events, cancer, and strokes. (…) Pooling the results showed no strong evidence that omega 3 fats have an effect on total mortality or combined cardiovascular events. The few studies at low risk of bias were more consistent, but they also showed no effect of omega 3 on total mortality or cardiovascular events. (…) They therefore conclude that it is not clear whether long chain or short chain omega 3 fats (together or separately) reduce or increase total mortality, cardiovascular events, cancer, or strokes.